Benton County CERT/ARES Volunteer Honored with Prestigious Award

From the Benton County Emergency Management Agency:

With the National CERT Conference 202One in the rearview mirror, we were given a special task: Deliver the prestigious 2021 Missouri Silver Star Award to one of our own!

The Missouri Silver Star Award is bestowed upon one volunteer from the great state of Missouri each year. It is “presented to an individual in Missouri whose dedicated, unselfish, and enthusiastic service has contributed to the growth and development of the CERT and Emergency Management communities.

This year, Mr. Stephen Swerline was named the recipient of the award!

Because of a last-minute family emergency, Stephen was unable to make it to the conference, so Deputy Director Samantha Henley (who nominated him for the award) brought it home to present to him!

Below you will find her nomination letter and the images of the presentation:

HERE AT THE BC MO EM, WE WANT TO CONGRATULATE STEPHEN AS WELL AS EXTEND OUR SINCERE GRATITUDE FOR HIS SELFLESSNESS AND THE TIME AND EFFORT HE GIVES AS A VOLUNTEER FOR BENTON COUNTY!

Up and at Em: Helping W0YQG Get Back on the Air

Tomorrow morning at 8:00 AM, there will be an effort at Kelly Stanfield W0YQG’s house to get her back on the air. Rex Green KE0VCR will be spearheading this project so that Kelly can operate again and has asked for volunteers for help.

If you would like to help out but don’t know where Kelly’s house is, contact EC Sam Henley at 573-569-3673 for information.

May 2021 Meeting

Greetings, all!

Sam here!

Thank you to the BC ARES members (and guests) who attended the May meeting.

We were able to line up the calendar with upcoming events, discuss the new website, and then it was on to training.

This month, with both ARES AECs present, it was time to get down to the nitty gritty of the report all ARES ECs are responsible for providing to the ARES DEC each month. We had a written breakdown of what goes in each box and then we went extremely in-depth into how the hours are tallied.

Another new practice is the resurrection of an old practice: At the end of the weekly net on Sunday evenings, I read off a question in ARRL Radiogram form which any operator can copy, answer, and the next week relay that answer back to me in ARRL Radiogram form. This gives us a chance to practice passing real messages so we will be prepared to do so in when we are activated for a large-scale emergency.

Once again, thank you to the volunteers who give me a slice of their time for such a worthwhile effort and group!

NOTE: We will NOT have a JUNE 2021 meeting, as it falls on the same day as Jubilee Days. We will be working from the Em Comm trailer in Warsaw! We will be having a meeting about Jubilee Days before the event, so stay tuned for updates!

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

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